The rise of the machines: AI powering manufacturing advancement

The manufacturing industry's contribution to global greenhouse gas emissions comes primarily from its intensive energy use.

In the UK, manufacturing output is higher now than it was 30 years ago and companies want to work more efficiently to use less energy so that their operations are more profitable and more environmentally sustainable. One way to do this is by bringing AI (artificial intelligence) onto the shop floor.

How is AI going to make such a difference? According to The Manufacturer, it's going to connect with IOT (Internet of Things) devices, to create 'smart machines'. This will, in time, enable the machines to not just work more efficiently on the tasks they are programmed for, but also adapt to continuously changing tasks and learn from it.

E.ON Optimum Manufacturing

Our new Optimum Manufacturing service, which is powered by Sight Machine, is helping manufacturers to optimise their business by connecting energy, building and process data to solve manufacturing use cases, be it energy and carbon reduction, increased throughput and quality or reduced waste, to drive profitability and sustainability across their plants.

Sight Machine's IOT-enabled digital manufacturing platform combines AI, machine learning and advanced analytics to identify ways to save energy and increase efficiency.

Manufacturing AI at work

With a smart factory run by computers comes increased security risks and many UK manufacturers have already been victims of cyber attacks, which can cause disruption ranging from a couple of hours downtime to serious financial loss.

To address this side of the AI revolution in manufacturing, Microsoft has just announced major improvements to its cloud computing system specifically for manufacturers using IOT factories to improve profits and environmental performance.

Another way AI can help transform manufacturing is through generative design, which uses cloud computing to identify better ways of creating things so they use less materials and energy. It's already being used in many industries to transform the manufacture of aircraft, vehicles and tools.

So it's safe to say that the new industrial revolution is underway, and this one will be driven by AI to help improve the impact that manufacturing has on the natural world.

The two billion tonne carbon challenge – because we need to think about 2050 today

When it comes to hitting our 2050 carbon targets we simply cannot wait for the ‘perfect’ solution to present itself – the simple sum is that the earlier you start the less you emit, and we can do so much with the tools at our disposal right now.

Hydrogen is often referenced as the ‘silver bullet’, the one technology that could solve our heating and transport demands but the fact is it remains a high cost option, requiring either large volumes of very low carbon electricity or carbon capture and storage. It won’t be viable to be deployed at scale for some years to come.

Should we wait for hydrogen at a time when action is required today?

Because what we do have today is a legacy of poorly-insulated homes contributing about 2.7 tonnes of carbon per home per year (over two billion tonnes of CO2 between now and 2050 if we carry on doing what we are doing now). And that’s just using the domestic figures, never mind commercial.

Currently there is a lack of supporting governmental policies, with numerous interested stakeholders spanning several government departments. To accelerate the decarbonisation of heat we need the government to incentivise rapid growth in energy efficiency, digitalisation of the energy system and low carbon heat sources. With the right environment we can absolutely achieve rapid decarbonisation of heat over the next decade.

So where do we start?

Energy efficiency matters. The majority (around 14 million) of properties in the UK carry an energy efficiency rating ‘D’ and consume twice the energy of an ‘A’ rated building. By 2050, 95% of homes will need to be ‘A’ rated.

New builds have an important role to play here. Each year a further 143k new houses and flats are built (which could easily rise to 300k). Establishing high efficiency, low temperature systems in these properties will pay dividends later and the Future Homes Standard announced in the spring statement is a strong step in the right direction.

Heat Pumps & Hydrogen

Heat pumps have the potential to be a replacement technology to existing gas boilers, are a good retrofit option and support the transition to a low carbon system. Hybrid heat pumps, which use gas to meet the occasional ‘peak’ heat demand periods offer a potential ‘no regrets’ option.

It’s however worth highlighting that installations need to have two key features. Firstly, the heating system needs to be improved to operate at lower temperatures and secondly the system needs to be ‘SMART’ to limit peak demand.

The Government’s Future Homes Standard will play a key role in supporting the deployment of heat pumps at scale in new builds, providing confidence to the supply chain to invest and innovate to meet this demand.

Low Carbon Heat Networks

In addition to energy efficiency and heat pumps, comes a further ‘no regrets option’ particularly where there is a high density of heating or cooling demand. Significant savings in energy consumption can be achieved where heating and cooling are situated in close proximity. E.ON’s ‘Ectogrid’ for example seeks to create a ‘breathing’ network where heat is used again and again as it passes through the city environment. These enable systems to tap into ‘waste’ heat such as sewage, rivers, tunnels using heat pumps with extremely high Coefficient of Performance.

Heat networks also provide a significant storage opportunity. In times of high demand, networks can store large volumes of energy as well as using ‘phase change’ storage. This can make huge progress into the challenge of smoothing the peak energy demand.

Again the Government could do more to remove barriers to growth, for example reducing business rates on networks and enabling heat pumps to be rates exempt.

What will the system look like to support the transition?

Heating is distinctly seasonal with peak demands being 5 times higher than peak electricity demand, needing c300GW of energy to be delivered at peak. For reference the electricity grid is capable of delivering around 60GWe at peak. Whether you use heat pumps or hydrogen this is a challenge to overcome… technologies such as batteries, pumped storage and smoother consumption can make a huge difference.

Clearly the electrification of heat will increase demand significantly over time – but a considerable amount can be done to meet this expectation. Through building an efficient, low temperature, digitally linked system electrification of heat is achievable.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Armstrong

John Armstrong is Head of Operations for E.ON’s District Heating business in the UK, leading the team who design, build and operate E.ON’s decentralised city energy systems, offering innovative solutions such as heating and cooling networks, heat pumps, combined heat & power and intelligent energy management systems. John has a degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham and a global energy MBA from the University of Warwick. In 13 years at E.ON John has worked in various engineering roles including city solutions, power generation and engineering safety. He is a chartered Engineer and Fellow of the Institute of Mechanical Engineers.

The two billion tonne carbon challenge – because we need to think about 2050 today

When it comes to hitting our 2050 carbon targets we simply cannot wait for the ‘perfect’ solution to present itself – the simple sum is that the earlier you start the less you emit, and we can do so much with the tools at our disposal right now.

Hydrogen is often referenced as the ‘silver bullet’, the one technology that could solve our heating and transport demands but the fact is it remains a high cost option, requiring either large volumes of very low carbon electricity or carbon capture and storage. It won’t be viable to be deployed at scale for some years to come.

Should we wait for hydrogen at a time when action is required today?

Because what we do have today is a legacy of poorly-insulated homes contributing about 2.7 tonnes of carbon per home per year (over two billion tonnes of CO2 between now and 2050 if we carry on doing what we are doing now). And that’s just using the domestic figures, never mind commercial.

Currently there is a lack of supporting governmental policies, with numerous interested stakeholders spanning several government departments. To accelerate the decarbonisation of heat we need the government to incentivise rapid growth in energy efficiency, digitalisation of the energy system and low carbon heat sources. With the right environment we can absolutely achieve rapid decarbonisation of heat over the next decade.

So where do we start?

Energy efficiency matters. The majority (around 14 million) of properties in the UK carry an energy efficiency rating ‘D’ and consume twice the energy of an ‘A’ rated building. By 2050, 95% of homes will need to be ‘A’ rated.

New builds have an important role to play here. Each year a further 143k new houses and flats are built (which could easily rise to 300k). Establishing high efficiency, low temperature systems in these properties will pay dividends later and the Future Homes Standard announced in the spring statement is a strong step in the right direction.

Heat Pumps & Hydrogen

Heat pumps have the potential to be a replacement technology to existing gas boilers, are a good retrofit option and support the transition to a low carbon system. Hybrid heat pumps, which use gas to meet the occasional ‘peak’ heat demand periods offer a potential ‘no regrets’ option.

It’s however worth highlighting that installations need to have two key features. Firstly, the heating system needs to be improved to operate at lower temperatures and secondly the system needs to be ‘SMART’ to limit peak demand.

The Government’s Future Homes Standard will play a key role in supporting the deployment of heat pumps at scale in new builds, providing confidence to the supply chain to invest and innovate to meet this demand.

Low Carbon Heat Networks

In addition to energy efficiency and heat pumps, comes a further ‘no regrets option’ particularly where there is a high density of heating or cooling demand. Significant savings in energy consumption can be achieved where heating and cooling are situated in close proximity. E.ON’s ‘Ectogrid’ for example seeks to create a ‘breathing’ network where heat is used again and again as it passes through the city environment. These enable systems to tap into ‘waste’ heat such as sewage, rivers, tunnels using heat pumps with extremely high Coefficient of Performance.

Heat networks also provide a significant storage opportunity. In times of high demand, networks can store large volumes of energy as well as using ‘phase change’ storage. This can make huge progress into the challenge of smoothing the peak energy demand.

Again the Government could do more to remove barriers to growth, for example reducing business rates on networks and enabling heat pumps to be rates exempt.

What will the system look like to support the transition?

Heating is distinctly seasonal with peak demands being 5 times higher than peak electricity demand, needing c300GW of energy to be delivered at peak. For reference the electricity grid is capable of delivering around 60GWe at peak. Whether you use heat pumps or hydrogen this is a challenge to overcome… technologies such as batteries, pumped storage and smoother consumption can make a huge difference.

Clearly the electrification of heat will increase demand significantly over time – but a considerable amount can be done to meet this expectation. Through building an efficient, low temperature, digitally linked system electrification of heat is achievable.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Armstrong

John Armstrong is Head of Operations for E.ON’s District Heating business in the UK, leading the team who design, build and operate E.ON’s decentralised city energy systems, offering innovative solutions such as heating and cooling networks, heat pumps, combined heat & power and intelligent energy management systems. John has a degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Birmingham and a global energy MBA from the University of Warwick. In 13 years at E.ON John has worked in various engineering roles including city solutions, power generation and engineering safety. He is a chartered Engineer and Fellow of the Institute of Mechanical Engineers.

‘Charity Champion’ Melissa’s leap of faith for Alzheimer’s Society

Nineteen-year old Melissa Greenwood conquered her nerves at the thought of jumping out of an aeroplane mid-flight to successfully complete her first skydive and raise more than £2,300 for Alzheimer’s Society.

Melissa, who works in Customer Services for energy company E.ON at its Raw Dykes Road office, was supported by colleagues who sponsored her and helped with her fundraising efforts through cake sales and raffles. Melissa acts as a Charity Champion for E.ON at its Leicester site, co-ordinating awareness and fundraising activities. As a result of her skydive more than £2,300 will now be passed to the charity.

Alzheimer’s Society has been E.ON’s official charity partner since 2016, with all the money raised by employees and donated by the company going to help the work of community-based Dementia Support Workers.

Melissa said: “I’ve got friends who’ve completed charity challenges, everything from bake sales to climbing Snowdon and Kilimanjaro, and I always fancied pushing myself to do something similar for a good cause one day. I didn’t realise that day would come around so quickly though – my Grandad Terry had dementia and he died late last year, so it suddenly felt time for me to step up and do my bit.

”Alzheimer’s Society is a cause close to my heart, and I hope my efforts will help other families who are living with dementia, and losing relatives to this illness. The fact that it is E.ON’s official charity helped my colleagues to really get on board and support my efforts.”

Visit eonenergy.com/charity for more information about E.ON’s partnership with Alzheimer’s Society.

Ends

For more information contact:

Jane Branscombe, 07921 491159, Jane.branscombe@eon-uk.com

Victoria Blake, 07738 143903, Victoria.blake@eonenergy.com

Busy Berlin airport to transform into pioneering energy hub

When one of Germany's oldest airports closes its runway, it will become home to one of the largest urban development projects in Europe.

The space where 20 million people a year now rush off on new adventures, will transform into a research and industrial park for urban technologies and a residential quarter with up to 6,000 flats — all built with the energy of tomorrow in mind.

E.ON and Berliner Stadtwerke will supply heat and cooling to this new district, known as Berlin TXL, using a pioneering low-temperature network called LowEx.

This environmentally friendly technology is similar to district heating – where one energy centre generates heat and power and is connected to homes or businesses through a network of pipes. LowEx however, operates at much lower temperatures – no higher than 40 degrees Celsius. This reduces heat loss and makes the system more efficient.

Unlike other districts, the energy in Berlin TXL will be generated, stored and consumed there. It will be home to a mix of power plants with sustainable energy at their heart, including air source heat pumps, photovoltaic and geothermal energy, combined heat and power, and waste water heat.

The LowEx network will also be able to take in energy from renewable energy sources on site, so businesses and residents in the district fitted with renewable systems can make, as well as consume energy.

The need for innovative heat and power solutions has never been greater. The heating and cooling in our buildings and industry makes up half of the EU's energy consumption. As Germany's largest city, Berlin is working hard to tackle its CO2 emissions and aims to be “climate neutral" by 2050.

Our next-generation energy solutions are a perfect fit for this new district, which is set to be a meeting place for entrepreneurs, students, investors, manufacturers, and scientists. Working together, we will be able to develop new solutions for the cities of tomorrow.

With innovative projects like this taking place around Europe, we are working to support a brighter future for us all.

Busy Berlin airport to transform into pioneering energy hub

When one of Germany's oldest airports closes its runway, it will become home to one of the largest urban development projects in Europe.

The space where 20 million people a year now rush off on new adventures, will transform into a research and industrial park for urban technologies and a residential quarter with up to 6,000 flats — all built with the energy of tomorrow in mind.

E.ON and Berliner Stadtwerke will supply heat and cooling to this new district, known as Berlin TXL, using a pioneering low-temperature network called LowEx.

This environmentally friendly technology is similar to district heating – where one energy centre generates heat and power and is connected to homes or businesses through a network of pipes. LowEx however, operates at much lower temperatures – no higher than 40 degrees Celsius. This reduces heat loss and makes the system more efficient.

Unlike other districts, the energy in Berlin TXL will be generated, stored and consumed there. It will be home to a mix of power plants with sustainable energy at their heart, including air source heat pumps, photovoltaic and geothermal energy, combined heat and power, and waste water heat.

The LowEx network will also be able to take in energy from renewable energy sources on site, so businesses and residents in the district fitted with renewable systems can make, as well as consume energy.

The need for innovative heat and power solutions has never been greater. The heating and cooling in our buildings and industry makes up half of the EU's energy consumption. As Germany's largest city, Berlin is working hard to tackle its CO2 emissions and aims to be “climate neutral" by 2050.

Our next-generation energy solutions are a perfect fit for this new district, which is set to be a meeting place for entrepreneurs, students, investors, manufacturers, and scientists. Working together, we will be able to develop new solutions for the cities of tomorrow.

With innovative projects like this taking place around Europe, we are working to support a brighter future for us all.

The ten-year anniversary we'd rather not celebrate…

With Ofgem apparently gearing up to begin its review of the microbusiness energy market, some will say it is about time the energy needs of microbusinesses are better met by the market, with greater protections where necessary. When I talk to microbusiness customers, many talk of their experiences with the market and the changes they want to see; being hounded by calls from brokers and TPIs, with many of these calls leaving the customer less than clear on who they’re talking to, who they represent and exactly how (and how much) they get paid.

The chance for Ofgem to review the matter, and for the players in this market to look at what we can do better, is something I welcome. But the indications are the review could last for several years, and there may not be any substantive action that results from it until March 2021.

Not only is that two years away, but it marks ten years since we first announced our intention to develop our own TPI Code of Practice (also adopted internally by our own sales teams) to seek to improve relationships with customers and provide a fairer, more transparent service.

In its most recent analysis, Cornwall Insight said “a code of practice for third party intermediaries . . . remains a consistent demand from suppliers and TPIs alike and is a notable emerging theme of our 2019 survey of TPI satisfaction with energy suppliers”.

TPI revenues, which are of course paid for by the customer whether they know it or not, are running at £300m a year. This means small businesses could have paid anywhere up to £3bn in broker fees in the last ten years without them being aware of where their money’s going.

As an industry, we bear responsibility for having created this issue. The brokers are only doing what the market drives them to do – blaming them is like blaming Premiership footballers for high wages when they’re just the recipients of the amounts of money being thrown around by the leagues, the TV money and the club chairmen.

But at E.ON, with our TPI Code, we took a stand, even though it has cost us financially and still does today. You get bad apples in any barrel and cowboys in any industry, but we believe our Code demonstrates that signing up to it brings with it a commitment to conduct business according to basic principles of trust and honesty

This is now reflected in levels of customer satisfaction. TPIs who signed up to our code, along with our own direct sales teams, sell energy in the right way for customers and this leads to fewer complaints and a more positive customer experience.

During the last ten years, adhering to our code has seen us reduce by more than half the number of TPIs that we will work with, and helped those brokers we do work with to deliver the same high standards as our own direct sales teams. In return we have seen customer complaints fall to our lowest ever levels, as evidenced by the Citizens Advice non-domestic league table and our own internal satisfaction tracking.

In fact the latest league table from Citizens Advice ranks E.ON top for handling complaints from business customers. It’s the third time we’ve taken the top spot since the data was first compiled in July 2016.

It’s heartening to be recognised for our service. We put much of this recent success down to our Code of Practice which was drawn up with input from customers and brokers to provide business customers with independent reassurance that they were dealing with parties that were trustworthy and who would contract with them in a fair and responsible way.

Not resting on our laurels

Earlier this year, we became corporate members of the Association of Professional Sales (APS), underlining a real commitment to investing in the development of our sales teams. We’re now chasing ‘Investor in Sales’ status by helping individual members of those teams to become professionally registered with the APS.

That’s what we’re doing to make life better for our customers. And it’s working. But there’s only so much we can do. Other suppliers and Ofgem need to play their part too, for the good of the industry, and for all of our customers.

I believe that other suppliers should be adopting these same principles, truly listening to their customers and not turning a blind eye to the poor practices that might give a short-term gain, but ultimately erode trust and customer satisfaction in our market.

We have clear evidence that, with the right controls and support in place, a hard core of professional TPIs can provide a valuable, transparent, compliant service for many UK businesses.

We don’t need to wait until 2021.

Iain Walker 

Iain Walker is Director of Business Energy Sales at E.ON UK, responsible for energy sales and management offerings for cities and business customers, from microbusiness and SME customers large industrial and corporate clients.

Iain was instrumental in creating the TPI Code of Practice, a set of standards that helps to protect business customers by making sure third party intermediaries are fair, honest and transparent when they sell energy.

Rampion celebrates first full year of renewable generation

The Rampion wind farm celebrated its first full year of generation last week. All 116 turbines were energised in the spring of 2018 and since then the site has made a significant contribution to the UK’s renewable energy needs.

The 400MW wind farm, 13km off the Sussex coast, has the capacity to power 350,000 homes1 or around half the homes in Sussex, reducing carbon emissions by around 600,000 tonnes a year2

Commenting on the first anniversary of E.ON’s latest renewable energy project, E.ON UK Chief Executive, Michael Lewis said: “Rampion has begun to play a vital role in the UK’s energy future, providing a proportion of the energy we need from low carbon sources. It’s one of many ways E.ON is working to deliver low carbon energy and we’ve invested more than £3.3 billion in renewable technologies in the UK over the last decade.”

Richard Crowhurst, Plant Manager for the Rampion Offshore Wind Farm said: “Over the last year the 65-strong Newhaven based team has worked tirelessly to ensure the site’s safe and effective operation, monitoring, servicing and maintaining the turbines.

“We’re also delighted to have our first four apprentices working as an integral part of our team and look forward to our other three apprentices returning to site from their training over the coming months and to welcoming an eighth apprentice onboard this summer.”

The Rampion visitor centre is also due to open on Brighton seafront this summer, housing interactive displays for visitors to learn more about climate change, offshore wind energy and the Rampion story.

From the South Coast to the North East, Rampion’s first year of generation coincides with the end of life of E.ON’s Blyth offshore wind farm in Northumberland, the UK’s first offshore wind farm. Built in 2000, Blyth provided E.ON with the experience and learning to go on to develop a further 1.5GW of wind capacity off the UK coast, including the Rampion site in operation today.

Rampion is one of several major sustainable energy projects in E.ON’s portfolio which includes London Array, once the world’s largest offshore wind farm, Blackburn Meadows biomass combined heat and power plant in Sheffield and the Citigen district heating hub in the City of London.

Michael Lewis added: “Britain’s renewable fleet is growing strongly and helping our response to climate change. The next big opportunity for all of us is helping our customers to have greater control over the energy they need; generating and even storing renewable energy at home or in business through solar and battery options, heat pumps and electric vehicle tariffs, greater efficiency in buildings management and community-scale district heating schemes, helping to create smart sustainable homes, businesses and cities.”

To get renewable energy in your home visit E.ON’s range of energy tariffs or to consider generating your own through solar power.

Ends

Notes to editors

1 = Based on an average annual domestic household electricity consumption of 3,938 kWh (BEIS).

2 = The calculation is made using a static figure of 430g/kWh representing the energy mix in the UK (1,366,560,000KWh x 430(g/kWh) / 1,000 = 587,621 tonnes pa.

  • The Rampion Offshore Wind Farm is owned by E.ON (50.1%), UK Green Investment Rampion Ltd (25%) and Enbridge (24.9%);
  • More details about the Rampion Offshore Wind Farm including key facts and news updates, plus a photo and a video gallery can be found at rampionoffshore.com.

Blue Planet, plastics and the pathway to a cleaner energy future

This week alone we’ve seen protests on the streets of London, the broadcast of Sir David Attenborough’s new climate change documentaryon the BBC (featuring the utterly inspirational Greta Thunberg) and we look forward to Earth Day on Monday.

Clearly the aim of these activities is to dramatically shift the dial around what should be done – and soon – to combat climate change, with many pinning their hopes on achieving the same sense of urgency and scale that Blue Planet II did for single-use plastics.

The worrying thing is we have known about the severity of global warming for years, decades even. Climate change is the defining issue of our era, certainly for our industry. It is both a global and a local issue and we can be a significant part of the solution.

Yet the energy system is still out of date – largely based on fossil fuels and large, distant power stations. It remains incredibly wasteful. We need a transformational, not incremental, response.

Because the majority of the UK’s greenhouse gas emissions are from the production and consumption of energy – whether that’s driving cars, vans and lorries, manufacturing goods or simply heating our homes. It can only be lowered if we all become more energy efficient and switch to low-carbon energy sources.

That means a future where we use less, and what we use comes from lower carbon sources, a future for the next generation.

We should start by increasing the rate of energy efficiency installations to millions of homes up and down the country – making energy efficiency a national infrastructure priority. Imagine making every home, business and even city energy efficient; putting solar panels on every roof, providing access to electric vehicle charging and local, renewable generation to all.

The energy revolution is under way and we’ve a big part to play in this. Building lasting relationships with customers and designing products and solutions that deliver value today, tomorrow and beyond.

The next opportunity is helping our customers to have greater control over the energy they need; generating and even storing renewable at home or in business through solar and battery options, heat pumps and electric vehicle tariffs, greater efficiency in business management and community-scale district heating schemes, helping to create smart sustainable homes, businesses and cities.

We’re now using our expertise to partner with developers and local authorities and provide solutions that enable them to deliver their sustainable strategies. Improving air quality and transforming and regenerating their cities with innovative renewable technologies and enabling the electrification of transport. Creating sustainable and cleaner cities that are great to live, work, play, where existing businesses thrive and new businesses invest.

Michael Lewis is Chief Executive of E.ON UK

Shining a light on the organisations behind the energy industry

When we walk into a dark room and turn on the light, we don't give much thought to how it works. Forget the technology involved. Behind that one simple act, there is a wide range of organisations and agreements that make it possible for us to boil the kettle, watch TV and stay warm.

Most people will be aware of the energy generators - the wind farms and power stations around the country that produce much of the power we need - as well as the transportation and distribution networks which transfer the power and gas to our homes and businesses, and the suppliers such as E.ON which manage the buying, the supplying, metering and billing for all of those services.

There are also the organisations that are relatively hidden from the view of consumers, but the work they do is essential for energy suppliers like us, so you can get your gas and electricity delivered without a hitch.

For us, one of the more exciting organisations is Elexon. Our own Political and Regulatory Affairs Director, Sara Vaughan, was recently appointed Non-Executive Director to its board. Elexon works with all aspects of the industry, making sure that supply and demand estimates match the actual volumes delivered, protecting generators, suppliers and customers alike.

We also rely on organisations like Xoserve, which holds the data we need to provide gas to customers. Its central register has information on gas suppliers for 24 million premises. Xoserve also processes around 3 million customer switches each year, along with £4 billion in invoices for transportation of gas.

We work closely with industry bodies like the Joint Office of Gas Transporters. It shares information on transportation arrangements and governance advice. That makes it easier for energy suppliers to understand our responsibilities and to standardise our practice with other gas transporters.

In addition to the organisations that help support the fundamentals of our business, there are also agreements, codes and contracts that suppliers and operators must sign up to and follow. Some of these are there to protect consumers like you. For example, if you've got a smart meter, the Smart Meter Installation Code of Practice and Smart Energy Code help ensure that your meter is installed properly and that you can easily understand how it works.

Other agreements like the Master Registration Agreement make it easy for customers to transfer from one electricity supplier to another.

This hidden network of organisations, codes and agreements may seem complicated. But in the end, they are there to make sure that you've got access to the gas and electricity you need, all day, everyday.

Discover the exciting technology behind the energy of tomorrow.