Centrica’s new power stations and battery power stations in the UK

Power_Station_UK

The construction of new power stations and battery power stations has come about as a result of the changing energy landscape.

Before, energy came from reliable sources such as coal and gas, whereas now, more and more power is coming from renewable sources like solar and wind.

While this is great during windy and sunny periods, there needs to be a backup solution. Typically, fast response plants are used during periods of high demands, but there is also a need for security of energy supply during dull days.

Here’s a look at some new power stations and battery power stations that Centrica is currently constructing throughout the UK.

1. Brigg

Part of Centrica’s £180m investment into flexible power generation and storage facilities, Brigg is a fast response 50MW gas-fired plant placed next to an existing Centrica power station.

Once complete, the new plant will operate as a highly flexible ‘peaking plant’ that will be able to go from a cold standstill up to full power in under two minutes. The plant is likely to run for a few hours a day when energy demand is high.

2. Peterborough

The same facility that has been built at Brigg is being constructed in Peterborough, and is expected to be up and running in the last quarter of 2018.

The 50MW gas-fired plant will play a key role in supporting local peaks in demand, producing enough energy to meet the needs of around 50,000 homes.

The plant will be made up of five small reciprocating engines that will typically be used on weekdays to meet periods of high demand or to provide back-up power when it’s needed.

3. Roosecote

Elsewhere, the construction of a 49MW facility in Roosecote was confirmed in December 2016.

This will be one of the world’s largest battery storage facilities, located at the site of the former Roosecote power station in Barrow.

The facility will respond to changes in the grid frequency in under a second, absorbing and exporting energy as needed to keep the grid at 50Hz.

brigg_power_station

CHP

Combined Heat & Power (CHP) converts a single fuel into both electricity and heat in a single process at the point of use.

This is more efficient (around 25% more – given conventional energy generation has an efficiency of around 50%, this is a huge difference) than traditional engines because it reduces the need to have a separate gas boiler to create heat on site. Energy generated can be stored for later use, or sold to the grid.

conventional_vs_chp_generation_power_station

In addition, Centrica is also working on smaller battery projects (2MW), which will give organisations such as local authorities control over energy usage and trading.

With on site generation like CHPs and solar panels, they can store energy when there’s excess and use it for later or export it to the grid.

Also read: A new record for renewables in the UK

Image credit: Utility Week

Mercedes Formula 1 engine reaches landmark efficiency target

Mercedes Formula 1 engine reaches landmark efficiency target

During a dyno test in September, Mercedes’ Formula 1 engine hit a landmark achievement at the team’s Brixworth factory, breaking the 50% thermal efficiency barrier for the very first time.

The German automotive manufacturer’s advancement is thought to have made its M08 EQ Power+ the most efficient racing engine to date, and overall one of the most efficient car engines.

Thermal efficiency has become a key focus for modern engine developers. It is calculated by the amount of useful energy that can be produced from a given amount of heat input.

In Formula 1’s turbo-hybrid era, Thermal efficiency became particularly important as a result of the strict fuel-flow limit rate of 100kg/hour in 2014

The F1 cars are now closing in on levels of thermal efficiency reached by diesel engines used in large container ships, although gas turbines can deliver more than 60% efficiency.

This 50% mark has yet to be reached on track, but it’s much higher than a 29% efficiency peak that old normally-aspirated V8 engines produced.

Back in 2014, Mercedes’ first turbo-hybrid engine had an efficiency rate of 44% and the 2017 unit reportedly produces 109bhp more using the same amount of fuel.

A column celebrating the achievement on Mercedes’ official website said “the last time we saw these levels of power in Formula 1 was back in 2005, with a V10 that guzzled fuel at a whopping 194kg/hour” – almost double the fuel-flow rate.

Mercedes described the accomplishment of producing more power than waste energy as “a remarkable milestone for any hybrid, and especially a flat-out racing engine”.

It has used a version of its F1 engine in its new Project ONE road car, which has a thermal efficiency of 40%.

Elsewhere, Renault has promised that it’s working hard to produce a “magic” F1 engine mode for 2018, in a bid to take the fight to Mercedes and Ferrari in qualifying.

Although Renaults’ current engine is proving to be a match for rival engines in the F1, it’s lacking extra power in qualifying.

Red Bull boss Christian Horner believes the lack of the kind of engine mode that Mercedes has is making all the difference in qualifying.

Horner said: “The problem with qualifying is we don’t have the high power modes that our competitors have. I am sure there is close to half a second (a lap) in that.

Renault boss Cyril Abiteboul said “we don’t have that sort of ‘magic’ qualifying mode, but we are working hard on it.

“The performance of the engine will improve very sensitively for next year, not just for qualifying, but also for the race, which makes me believe that the engine will be extremely competitive,” he added.

With the United States Grand Prix taking place this weekend, Lewis Hamilton of Mercedes can clinch his fourth world title if he outscores Vettel by 16 points. A second engine fault in weeks for Vettel and Ferrari in the Japanese GP has proved costly.

Also read: F1 car vs. electric vehicle: which is more energy efficient?

 

Sources:

https://www.autosport.com/f1/news/131772/mercedes-engine-hits-remarkable-dyno-target

https://www.autosport.com/f1/news/132222/renault-working-on-magic-engine-mode

http://www.skysports.com/f1/news/12433/11072104/lewis-hamilton-could-win-f1-2017-world-title-at-the-united-states-gp

http://www.skysports.com/f1/news/12433/11071989/japanese-gp-sebastian-vettel-suffers-engine-blow-and-retires-from-race

Image Source: James Allen on F1

Centrica’s response to Prime Minister’s Party Conference Speech

Centrica

Last week, Centrica Chief Executive Iain Conn, spoke to BBC Radio 4 in response to the Prime Minister’s party conference speech. Below  is the conversation between Conn and BBC Radio 4 presenter, Justin Webb.

Justin Webb, presenter: The energy price cap is back on. In her speech, Theresa May was pretty blunt about the monopolies and vested interests, who she said held people back and one of the greatest examples, she said, was the energy industry. Britain’s biggest energy supplier is Centrica, the company that owns British Gas. Iain Conn is their chief executive and is on the line now.

Good morning to you.

Iain Conn, CEO, Centrica: Good morning, Justin.

JW: How disappointed are you?

IC: Well, my main concern in all this is for our customers as well as for other stakeholders. It creates exaggerated uncertainty and we’ve got to remember this is a draft bill aimed at giving the regulator more powers rather than actually legislating a cap. We do agree the market needs further structural changes and we also agree the Government and regulator need to enable that change. We just don’t support price caps.

JW: Why not?

IC: Well, there is clear evidence that they don’t work. In New Zealand, in Spain, in California, in Ontario, they tend to limit choice, reduce competition, and prices tend to bunch around the cap and, in fact, we’ve seen that this year in the U.K. with a new prepayment metre cap where most prices are within £2 of each other.

JW: Is it likely that there will be fewer cheap fixed offers in order to pay for the cap?

IC: Well, look, I think the problem with… one of the problems with the market today is it’s possible to offer a really cheap deal, possibly even making a loss for the supplier, and when a proportion of the customers come to the end of that fixed deal, if they’re not watching, they can be bounced straight onto a very high priced standard variable tariff price. All standard tariffs are not expensive. Ours is cheaper than 85% in the market.

JW: But hold on a second. My question is whether those very cheap deals will go as a result of this.

IC: I think that’s one of the real risks. We’ve seen it in many markets where the cheap deals go because the mechanism for people to make money out of the market has changed and that’s what I was trying to explain.

JW: But possibly… I mean, it could well be though that people accept that that is going to be a price to pay if you don’t have people who are trapped, if you don’t have people who are… who don’t have the time or don’t have the inclination or don’t have the ability to sort themselves out in the market, if those people are protected then that is a price worth paying.

IC: So we agree some people need to be protected and in fact have done a significant amount voluntarily to protect groups of customers. The main problem with the market, if I may Justin, is the standard variable tariff and rather than cap them, which will ironically keep them going, we believe the standard variable tariff should come to an end for good. We think it is better for the long-term and it will solve these problems.

JW: Well, how would that work?

IC: Basically, what you do is the regulator would need to regulate that contracts that go on and on forever can’t happen anymore. They have got to have a fixed term, and secondly, this mechanism which is in the regulation that at the end of your fixed contract, you can be pushed onto a standard tariff, that can be changed. This would change the behaviour in the market.

JW: You have only got yourselves to blame, though, haven’t you in the big companies. You have got the Competition and Markets Authority saying that he six large firms together, people have paid an average of, I think, it is ₤1.5 billion more than they would have done under a well-functioning market over a recent period. You have got your own company making a decent amount of money. You have got your own salary hugely boosted recently. I think your total package is more than ₤4 million a year. There is just this sense, isn’t there, that politically you have messed up.

IC: I have only been in this business for the last few years, but I certainly think our industry has an element of the blame in how this market has evolved. But on this point about this overcharging by ₤1.4 billion, I just want to be clear, although the CMA came up with this, it clearly isn’t right. It is more than the entire profits made in the whole market.

JW: Again, it is your word against theirs and politically, it is quite a difficult place for you to be in, isn’t it now, because you have got Labour and you have got the Conservatives, and you have got an awful lot of your own consumers saying something has to be done.

IC: We agree, something has to be done, absolutely agree and, in fact, the regulator was consulting on this at the very request of the Government and they haven’t quite reported out yet. Just to be clear, we have been working hard with the Government and Ofgem on all of this and we have our own plans to improve this market once we hear from the regulator.

JW: In a word, your message to the Government this morning is, ‘wait, don’t go ahead with this’?

IC: Our message is, ‘wait don’t go ahead with price caps, there is a much better way of solving this market for the long run.’

JW: Ian Conn, Chief Executive of Centrica, thanks very much. Dom, our business JW was listening. Interesting idea, actually, isn’t it, Dominic that you just get rid of the whole of the variable rates.

Dominic O’Connell, business JW: This is the energy industry trying to pre-empt what Theresa May is going to do and I suspect it probably won’t be enough. Once you have a Prime Minister saying, having gone back a number of times that there is going to be price caps and there is probably going to be price caps. Having said that, we don’t quite know what form the price caps will take. We have got a draft bill next week and what Ofgem, the regulator itself proposes, and Centrica’s idea will undoubtedly form part of what that cap finally takes, what form the cap finally takes. But Conn does make a very good point in that is the structure of the regulation that has in part created this market where you go onto standard variable tariffs and they end up being expensive.

Diesel and petrol vehicles to be banned by 2040 in the UK

2040_end_of_petrol_diesel_vehicles

In a combat to fight a growing air pollution crisis, Britain announced in July this year that sales of new diesel and petrol cars and vans would reach the end of the road by 2040.

These plans follow France’s commitment to take polluting vehicles off the road as a step to Europe’s push to curb emissions and fight climate change by promoting electric cars.

Car manufacturers are also taking action, with Volvo recently saying that it would phase out the internal combustion engine in the coming years and BMW choosing to build an electric version of its popular Mini car in Britain.

However, this shift towards electric vehicles is not instant, but rather a gradual one set by Britain. Britain’s new clean air strategy, calls for the sales of new petrol and diesel vehicles to end by 2040.

Government has also said that it will make £255 million available for local governments to take short-term action, such as modifying buses, to reduce air pollution.

“It is important that we all gear up for a significant change which deals not just with the problems to health caused by emissions, but the broader problems caused in terms of accelerating climate change,” says Michael Gove, Environment Secretary.

Transport Secretary, Chris Grayling promised a “green revolution in transport,” adding that the government wanted nearly every car and van on Britain’s roads to have zero emissions by 2050.

Cars generally have a lifespan of roughly 15 years, so even if Britain follows through with its target, conventional engines are likely to be on the country’s roads more than a decade later.

Elsewhere, China is also eyed the eventual ban of petrol and diesel vehicles. The world’s largest car market is currently studying a move to eventually ban combustion engine cars.

“Some countries have made a timeline for when to stop the production and sales of traditional fuel cars,” said industry vice-minister Xin Guobin.

“The ministry has also started relevant research and will make such a timeline with relevant departments. Those measures will certainly bring profound changes for our car industry’s development,” he added, predicting “turbulent” times ahead for the auto industry.

Were China to go-ahead and provide such a deadline, it would greatly aid efforts to end the reign of the internal combustion engine.

China has the largest automobile manufacturing base in the world — producing more than 28 million vehicles overall in 2016.

Also read: Toyota Mirai: Everything you need to know about the hydrogen car

References:

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/26/world/europe/uk-diesel-petrol-emissions.html?mcubz=0

https://www.ft.com/content/d3bcc6f2-95f0-11e7-a652-cde3f882dd7b

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/jul/25/britain-to-ban-sale-of-all-diesel-and-petrol-cars-and-vans-from-2040

Image source: Richard Nelson

Mazda has developed a more efficient petrol engine

Mazda develops a more efficient petrol engine

From 2019, Japanese carmaker Mazda says its cars will be fitted with engines that largely eliminate the need for spark plugs, improving fuel consumption by 30%.

At a time when industry steers toward electric vehicles, Mazda has developed a more efficient petrol engine.

It says the compression ignition engine was up to 30% more fuel-efficient than current engines – and it plans to sell cars with this new engine by 2019.

Mazda said it would work with Toyota to develop electric vehicle technology and construct a $1.6 billion plant in the US.

“We think it is an imperative and fundamental job for us to pursue the ideal internal combustion engine,” said Mazda’s head of research and development, Kiyoshi Fujiwara.

“Electrification is necessary but… the internal combustion engine should come first,” he added.

Mazda said its Skyactiv-X engine, as it is known, would be the world’s first commercial petrol engine to use compression ignition.

“It’s a major breakthrough,” said Ryoji Miyashita, chairman of automotive engineering company AEMSS.

This will put the company ahead of rivals, including Daimler and General Motors that have worked on compression ignition for decades.

According to Mazda, the fuel-air mixture ignites spontaneously when compressed by the piston in the new engine. It said the Skyactiv-X engine combined the advantages of petrol and diesel engines to improve efficiency.

As it stands, Mazda has no plans to supply the engine to other carmakers.

Furthermore, the company said it aimed to make autonomous-driving technology standard in all of its models by 2025, a move that may be linked hand-in-hand with fully battery-powered electric cars.

With the industry steering in the direction of electric vehicles, in a bid to reduce air pollution, the UK will ban the sale of new petrol cars and diesel cars by 2040.

Volvo has also recently announced that its new car models would be developed with electric or hybrid engines from 2019, while Silicon Valley-based electric car company Tesla recently started delivering its more mass-market aimed car, the Model 3, which can travel up to 310 miles between charges with an extended range battery.

 

Also Read: Toyota Mirai: Everything you need to know about the hydrogen car

 

 

Reference:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-40873093

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/aug/08/mazda-petrol-engine-breakthrough-puts-another-nail-in-the-coffin-of-diesel

Energy use in industry: electricity and energy manufacturing

National grid

In the 1980s technology seemed to be booming, but productivity was almost stagnant. Economists dubbed it the “productivity paradox”.

Rewind 100 years. Another remarkable new technology was proving disappointing: electricity.

Some corporations were investing in electric dynamos and motors and installing them in the workplace. Yet the expected surge in productivity did not come.

In 1900, less than 5% of mechanical drive power in American factories was coming from electric motors. The age of steam lingered.

Back then a steam-powered factory was something awe-inspiring.

Until about 1910, plenty of entrepreneurs looked at the new electrical drive system and opted for good old-fashioned steam.

More efficient: electric factories

Electric motors could do much more. Electricity allowed power to be delivered exactly where and when it was needed.

A factory powered by steam needed to be built strong enough to carry huge steel drive shafts, where as one powered by electricity could be light and airy.

Rather than arranging the factory around the logic of the driveshaft, electricity meant you could organise factories on the logic of a production line.

Old factories were dark and dense, while new factories could spread out, with wings and windows allowing natural light and air.

In the old factories, the steam engine would determine the pace. In new factories, workers could do so. As a whole, new factories could be cleaner, safer and more efficient – as the machines only needed to run when in use.

However, these results could not come about by simply ripping out the steam engine and replacing it with an electric motor – everything needed to be changed, including the architecture and the production process.

Workers had more autonomy and flexibility, which meant the way in which they were recruited, trained and paid also had to be changed.

It was understandable why factory owners hesitated to switch to electric factories – they didn’t want to get rid of their existing capital. But at the same time, they may have also struggled to imagine the implications of a world where everything needed to adapt to the new technology.

In the end, however, change was unavoidable and it did happen.

How to cut down on energy manufacturing bills

A successful manufacturing business is all about efficiency. Here are a few tips to help you cut your energy manufacturing bills:

Manufacturing motors: Reducing motor speed by 20% can reduce energy consumption by up to 50%

Compressed air: A compressor that’s left on but not used consumes up to 70% of its full load power

Factory heating and insulation: 12% of all the energy used by the manufacturing industry is for heating buildings

Factory lighting: LED bulbs could reduce the electricity you use for lighting by up to 80%

Refrigeration: When buying new refrigerators, AA++ rated units have the lowest running costs

Also read: Business leaders discuss how they cut down on energy bills

 
 

References:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-40673694

https://www.britishgas.co.uk/business/smarter-working/energy-made-simple/manufacturing

Big businesses that are getting serious about renewable energy

renewable energy businesses

More and more big companies around the world are embracing renewable energy in a big way.

With solar and wind power achieving cost competitiveness with fossil fuels, and investors seeing the long-term risks of powering their businesses in ways that impact the environment, addressing the climate crisis has become an economic imperative.

Tesco

In April, Tesco pledged to go 100 per cent renewable in the UK this year, and by 2030 worldwide.

Tesco says it has spent more than £700m in energy efficiency, reducing its carbon emissions by 41 per cent and also cutting its electricity bill by £200 million a year.

In its statement, Tesco said: “As a food retailer, our supply chain and long-term business success depend on the health of the natural environment.”

“As citizens and members of the community, our customers and colleagues expect Tesco to play its part in caring for the planet.”

The supermarket giant added: “From 2017, we’ll switch to 100 per cent renewable electricity in the UK and Ireland, supported by renewable certificates.”

“In Thailand, we invested £8m in on-site solar generation in 2016, with plans to grow this in coming years.”

Coca-Cola

Similarly, Coca-Cola European Partners (CCEP) has started sourcing 100% of its electricity from renewable sources with the launch of its new solar energy farm to support production at its Yorkshire site.

Coca-Cola predicts that it would save 3,800t of carbon dioxide per year, thanks to the new solar farm and its existing energy saving systems.

“The Wakefield solar farm is a long-term sustainability project for CCEP, capable of producing up to 5MW of energy at full capacity”, says Nick Brown, Head of sustainability at CCEP.

He added: “We’ve been collaborating with partners across Great Britain to build our renewable energy credentials and have enjoyed working together with a number of local groups and businesses in Wakefield to support this.”

Whitebread (Costa Coffee & Premier Inn)

Joining the list is U.K. hospitality giant Whitbread, who have committed to 100 per cent renewable energy.

The business – which owns Costa Coffee and Premier Inn – said that since the beginning of April this year, all its brands had been sourcing their purchased electricity in the U.K. from renewables.

“As the UK’s largest hospitality brand, we have a responsibility and an opportunity to drive change within the industry which is why we have made this decision for the business,” Whitbread’s director of sustainability, James Pitcher, said in a statement.

“Whitbread is committed to minimising its environmental impact and operating in a way that respects people and the planet and we hope this will be a landmark step in helping to set the industry standard,” Pitcher added.

LEGO:

Going even further, LEGO reached its 100% renewable energy target three years ahead of schedule.

The children’s toy company achieved this ambitious goal due to the completion of a 258 megawatt offshore wind farm in the Irish Sea, building a giant wind turbine made entirely of LEGO to celebrate.

“We work to leave a positive impact on the planet and I am truly excited about the inauguration of the Burbo Bank Extension wind farm,” said Bali Padda, CEO of the LEGO Group.

Also read: A new record for renewables in the UK

References:

http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/tesco-switch-renewable-lectricity-energy-uk-2017-by-2030-worldwide-supermarket-a7739076.html

www.foodmanufacture.co.uk/Manufacturing/Coca-Cola-European-Partners-commits-to-100-renewable-energy

https://www.cnbc.com/2017/05/11/whitbread-uks-biggest-hospitality-company-commits-to-renewable-energy.html

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/news/lego-renewable-energy-green-wind-farm-burbo-bank-extension-offshore-irish-sea-climate-change-a7746696.html

Big businesses that are getting serious about renewable energy

renewable energy businesses

More and more big companies around the world are embracing renewable energy in a big way.

With solar and wind power achieving cost competitiveness with fossil fuels, and investors seeing the long-term risks of powering their businesses in ways that impact the environment, addressing the climate crisis has become an economic imperative.

Tesco

In April, Tesco pledged to go 100 per cent renewable in the UK this year, and by 2030 worldwide.

Tesco says it has spent more than £700m in energy efficiency, reducing its carbon emissions by 41 per cent and also cutting its electricity bill by £200 million a year.

In its statement, Tesco said: “As a food retailer, our supply chain and long-term business success depend on the health of the natural environment.”

“As citizens and members of the community, our customers and colleagues expect Tesco to play its part in caring for the planet.”

The supermarket giant added: “From 2017, we’ll switch to 100 per cent renewable electricity in the UK and Ireland, supported by renewable certificates.”

“In Thailand, we invested £8m in on-site solar generation in 2016, with plans to grow this in coming years.”

Coca-Cola

Similarly, Coca-Cola European Partners (CCEP) has started sourcing 100% of its electricity from renewable sources with the launch of its new solar energy farm to support production at its Yorkshire site.

Coca-Cola predicts that it would save 3,800t of carbon dioxide per year, thanks to the new solar farm and its existing energy saving systems.

“The Wakefield solar farm is a long-term sustainability project for CCEP, capable of producing up to 5MW of energy at full capacity”, says Nick Brown, Head of sustainability at CCEP.

He added: “We’ve been collaborating with partners across Great Britain to build our renewable energy credentials and have enjoyed working together with a number of local groups and businesses in Wakefield to support this.”

Whitebread (Costa Coffee & Premier Inn)

Joining the list is U.K. hospitality giant Whitbread, who have committed to 100 per cent renewable energy.

The business – which owns Costa Coffee and Premier Inn – said that since the beginning of April this year, all its brands had been sourcing their purchased electricity in the U.K. from renewables.

“As the UK’s largest hospitality brand, we have a responsibility and an opportunity to drive change within the industry which is why we have made this decision for the business,” Whitbread’s director of sustainability, James Pitcher, said in a statement.

“Whitbread is committed to minimising its environmental impact and operating in a way that respects people and the planet and we hope this will be a landmark step in helping to set the industry standard,” Pitcher added.

LEGO:

Going even further, LEGO reached its 100% renewable energy target three years ahead of schedule.

The children’s toy company achieved this ambitious goal due to the completion of a 258 megawatt offshore wind farm in the Irish Sea, building a giant wind turbine made entirely of LEGO to celebrate.

“We work to leave a positive impact on the planet and I am truly excited about the inauguration of the Burbo Bank Extension wind farm,” said Bali Padda, CEO of the LEGO Group.

Also read: A new record for renewables in the UK

References:

http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/tesco-switch-renewable-lectricity-energy-uk-2017-by-2030-worldwide-supermarket-a7739076.html

www.foodmanufacture.co.uk/Manufacturing/Coca-Cola-European-Partners-commits-to-100-renewable-energy

https://www.cnbc.com/2017/05/11/whitbread-uks-biggest-hospitality-company-commits-to-renewable-energy.html

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/news/lego-renewable-energy-green-wind-farm-burbo-bank-extension-offshore-irish-sea-climate-change-a7746696.html

Renewables set to replace gas as South Australia’s main source of electricity

battery_energY_south_australia

Presuming that renewable projects proceed, 67% of South Australia’s electricity capacity will be provided by renewables by 2025, analysts say.

Industry analysts say that gas generators will no longer be South Australia’s main source of energy within eight years. This is a direct result to the rise of renewables and battery storage.

South Australia’s energy transition could be a “leading case study on managing a power system in transition for other mature markets to follow”, says a report by Wood Mackenzie.

The news comes as the states government progresses ahead with plans to build its own new gas generator and AGL pursues plans to construct a new gas power station to replace part of its ageing Torrens Island gas generator.

“Currently, South Australia’s peak loads are managed by open-cycle gas turbine (OCGT) plants,” said Wood Mackenzie’s Asia-Pacific power and renewables principal analyst, Bikal Pokharel. “But, by 2025, battery storage would be cheaper than OCGTs in managing peak loads … OCGTs would then be relegated as emergency back-ups.”

According to the report by Wood Mackenzie and Greentech Media Research, battery costs will fall by 50% by 2025.

“If current cost trends continue, 2025 could very well see renewables and batteries overtake rival generating alternatives in dominating South Australia’s power system, and the region could become a leading case study on managing a power system in transition for other mature markets to follow,” Pokharel said.

Researchers estimate that 1600 MWh of battery storage would be enough to satisfy South Australia’s needs by 2025. This is 4 times the capacity and 12times the storage of Tesla’s new Hornsdale facility that was announced this month. This is a very different type of battery system, as it isn’t designed for energy security but for residential peak supply.

Analysts say that the price of battery storage could drive gas out of the system, along with the high penetration of wind and solar. 67% of South Australia’s energy capacity may be provided by renewables by 2025.

That energy capacity would need dispatchable power to make up for the unpredictable nature of wind and solar power. However, annalists believe that gas would not be able to deliver such a service.

“With significantly increased renewable penetration and hence the intermittency, monthly and hourly gas demand fluctuations will be increasingly pronounced,” Pokharel told the Guardian. “Current gas supply and transportation terms cannot meet this type of demand profile.”

As a result, expensive diesel generators might become economic since the fuel can easily be stored and made quickly available when needed.

Pokharel said changes to the operation of the market could allow gas to compete after that date. To do that, subsidies would be required in return for standing capacity, or for “must-run” gas units.

The state also said on Thursday that it will seek to reduce the electricity bills of more than 180,000 low-income households by directly negotiating with energy companies on their behalf.

The Australian government will allow energy companies to bid to be the supplier for low-income households that currently receive energy grants.

“We know the majority of people receiving the state government’s energy concessions are on standing contracts; we believe we can negotiate a much better deal for them,” Bettison said.

Along with offering lower prices on energy, the government is hoping that energy companies will also include flexible payment options to assist people paying their bills.

Also read: A new record for renewables in the UK

Reference:

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2017/jul/27/gas-to-be-replaced-as-south-australias-main-electricity-source-within-decade-analysts-say

Image Source: view here

How much energy can Usain Bolt Generate

bolt

Usain Bolt will take to the global stage one last time at the London 2017 World Championships, bidding to crown his track career with more gold medals.

Bolt wants to go down in history as ‘unbeatable’ as he prepares to say goodbye. The Jamaican sprinter plans to run in the 100m final and 4x100m relay at the IAAF World Athletics Championships in London.

Bolt’s fastest time was in Berlin, where he ran the 100m final in 9,58 seconds. The infographic below illustrates how much energy Usain Bolt generated in this time.

Bolt 2

References:

https://www.daftlogic.com/information-appliance-power-consumption.htm

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/revealed-the-science-behind-usain-bolt-power-burst-used-to-the-100m-world-record-8732545.html

Image reference: alphacoders